Events

lens of the market

Lens of the Market Stage Two

January 22 | EMU Gumwood Room
January 23 | EMU Cedar Spruce Room
January 24 | EMU Cedar Spruce Room

The Lens of the Market Program aims to provide participants with market awareness stemming from their own fundamental science pursuits to enhance the impact of their research and address global challenges. Stage Two of the program consists of an optional, three-day workshop that provides an introduction to the vocabulary, skills, tools and road map needed to engage in translating research into innovations. 

 

For questions, please email Janet Macha.

student in lab

Genomics in Action

Friday, January 31 from 8:00am - 7:30pm | Ford Alumni Center Ballroom

The Knight Campus Internship Program's Bioinformatics and Genomics Master's Program is hosting its annual Genomics in Action meeting on Friday, Jan. 31. Join academic and industry leaders to learn about innovative approaches to bioinformatics. 

 

Space is limited, please register by Jan. 17 if you're planning to attend.
 

Register for this event

michelle and kelly in lab

Knight Campus Luncheon and Panel Discussion:
Establishing a Culture that Values and Promotes Diversity in STEM

Friday, February 21 from 12:00pm - 1:30pm | EMU Ballroom

Join us for a free luncheon and panel discussion that will examine the implementation of diversity plans and programs. Joining Knight Campus Vice President and Executive Director Robert Guldberg will be panelists Nancy Allbritton, dean of the University of Washington’s College of Engineering and Scott Ashford, dean of Oregon State University’s College of Engineering. Both Allbritton and Ashford are known for their successes in diversity and inclusion. Panelists will also assess the current state of diversity within the engineering field, while sharing advice for programs and administrators, lessons learned, and creative solutions.

 

Guests are asked to RSVP online by February 17. Lunch will be provided.
 

Register for this event

kathleen hall jamieson

MCST Speaker Series featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson

Tuesday, March 10 (Time and Location TBA)

The Knight Campus is co-sponsoring the Media Center for Science and Technology's Speaker Series with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Jamieson’s work in science communication explores the gap between expert knowledge of scientific issues and the public perception of it. She is the editor of the Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication, a compendium of research by the leading scholars in this field. Jamieson is also the founder of FactCheck.org and its subsidiary SciCheck.

MCST

Winter Research Forum in Science Communication

Dates TBA

A wide range of faculty across the UO campus are engaged with research in the science of science communication. The MCST and the Knight Campus will convene an afternoon research forum in winter 2020 to bring together faculty and students interested in science communication. The event will focus on current and potential research at the UO in this area and in connecting collaborators across disciplines.

Joint Science Seminars calendar

 

 

more Upcoming Events

Jan 22
Searching for Dark Matter, Uncovering the Mysteries of the Universe6:00 p.m.

University of Oregon physicist Tien-Tien Yu gives a free Quack Chats pub talk on “Searching for Dark Matter, Uncovering the Mysteries of the Universe.”
January 22 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Downtown Athletic Club, Ax Billy Grill

University of Oregon physicist Tien-Tien Yu gives a free Quack Chats pub talk on “Searching for Dark Matter, Uncovering the Mysteries of the Universe.”

Jan 23
Wine Chat: "Strange Cohabitations: Sharing Churches after the Reformation, 1530-2020"6:00 p.m.

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a...
January 23 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Civic Winery and Wines

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a 2019–20 OHC Faculty Research Fellow.

At one time or another, approximately 1,000 churches in Europe were shared by two or more Christian religions—Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinist. About 120 still exist today in France, Germany, and Switzerland; in recent years, a few new ones have been created. The story of how they formed, how they evolved, and how they faded away can tell us a great deal about the shifting meanings that ordinary people ascribed to community, religion, toleration, and intolerance from the sixteenth century to the present.

Feb 5
“Beyond the Spotted Owl: The History of Timber Workers and Environmentalism in the Pacific Northwest”6:00 p.m.

University of Oregon history professor Steven Beda gives a free Quack Chats pub talk. Food and drinks available for purchase at The Ax Billy.
February 5 6:00 p.m.
Downtown Athletic Club, Ax Billy Grill, third floor

University of Oregon history professor Steven Beda gives a free Quack Chats pub talk.

Food and drinks available for purchase at The Ax Billy.

Feb 5
Ideas on Tap: Race, Democracy, and Boundaries of Belonging6:00 p.m.

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join University of Oregon...
February 5 6:00 p.m.
Viking Braggot Co. Southtowne

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join University of Oregon political scientist Debra Thompson for Return: Race, Democracy, and the Boundaries of Belonging in North America. Drawing on her connections to Black America as well as Canada, where many enslaved Black Americans fled, Thompson will explore how time and geography influence our understandings of race, inviting us to reconsider ideas of home, belonging, diaspora, and democracy.

Admission is free and food and beverages are available for purchase. Learn more at mnch.uoregon.edu/learn/ideas-on-tap.

Mar 4
Ideas on Tap: Where is My Arm?6:00 p.m.

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join University of Oregon...
March 4 6:00 p.m.
Viking Braggot Co. Southtowne

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join University of Oregon human physiology professor Andy Karduna for Where is My Arm?—a discussion about proprioception, or how we know where our body is in space. 

Admission is free and food and beverages are available for purchase. Learn more at mnch.uoregon.edu/learn/ideas-on-tap.

 

KNIGHT CAMPUS DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

brian druker

Imatinib as a Paradigm of Targeted Cancer Therapies

Brian Druker, MD, director of the Knight Cancer Institute and associate dean for oncology of the OHSU School of Medicine, was the speaker at the second annual Knight Campus Distinguished Lecture. Dr. Druker discussed how he spearheaded the highly successful clinical trials of imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, which led to FDA approval of the drug in record time.

2019 Lecture

 

recent events

The Future is Here
Bob Guldberg, Vice President and Executive Director of the Knight Campus, highlights his research on regenerative medicine and shares insights from his career translating new medical devices into improved patient care.
A Spectrum of Promise

Laura Lee McIntyre gave a community presentation where she highlighted how early identification of developmental disorders can lead to promising intervention and prevention strategies.

Science at the Nexus of Life and Death

Patrick Phillips, professor of biology and special advisor to the president, gave a community lecture where he discussed his research on aging and the challenges and the opportunities created by the potential for prolonging life.

Mind, Brain and Reality
David McCormick, director of the Institute of Neuroscience, explored how the human brain creates the reality in which our minds operate at a community presentation.