Events

kcip inclusion symposium

The Knight Campus Internship Program's Inclusion Network Symposium

Saturday, August 17th from 9:00 am - 3:00 pm | OMSI Auditorium Building in Portland, OR

Current and former Knight Campus Internship Program students are invited to attend the third annual Inclusion Network Symposium in Portland, Oregon. The symposium is the capstone event of the summer inclusion workshop series, which focused on topics such as legal rights and responsibilities on the job; how to push for inclusion by example; company culture and how it affects success; and the value of difficult conversations with coworkers and supervisors. The workshops included guest speakers from academia and industry who shared perspectives and insights. There will also be an Alumni Social the night before the symposium on Friday, August 16th at 6:00 pm at Brix Tavern. 

elizabeth hillman

New Techniques for High-Speed In-Vivo Imaging and Microscopy featuring Elizabeth Hillman

Monday, August 19 from 10:00 am - 11:00 am | EMU Diamond Lake Room

Modern biomedical research has been revolutionized by our ability to fluorescently label cellular structure and function. The rapid evolution of transgenic techniques, novel organisms and organoids, and manipulation tools like optogenetics as well as tissue clearing have further expanded the scope of how we can study living systems. However, imaging methods that can capitalize on these diverse samples face limitations on their imaging speeds, particularly for 3D imaging in complex samples and networks. To address these challenges, Columbia University biomedical engineering and radiology professor, Elizabeth Hillman, has developed techniques that promote high-speed in-vivo imaging and microscopy.

jason burdick

Engineering Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications featuring Jason A. Burdick

Friday, September 13 from 10:00 am - 11:00 am | EMU Coquille Room

Hydrogels represent a class of biomaterials that have great promise for the repair of tissues and to probe questions related to cellular microenvironments. They can provide instructive signals to cells through material properties alone via chemical signals presented by the hydrogel, or through the release of therapeutics that can influence morphogenesis and tissue repair. Dr. Jason A. Burdick is particularly interested in the engineering of hydrogels from hyaluronic acid (HA), where chemical modification – either through non-covalent self-assembly or through stable covalent crosslinking – is used to engineer hydrogel properties. 

 

Dr. Burdick has explored how the introduction of peptides (e.g., HAV to mimic N-cadherin interactions) influences the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stromal cells, including through the development of high-throughput screening platforms where optimal cellular environments can be easily identified. After encapsulation and early in culture, cells deposit their own extracellular matrix, which temporally modulates this engineered interface. He is utilizing metabolic labeling techniques to visualize this matrix and to better understand how this evolving/new cell-matrix interface influences cell behavior, such as during chondrogenesis or in mechanobiology. Dr. Burdick's lab is developing 3D printing techniques to translate these findings of cell-hydrogel interactions towards therapeutic applications, including in the development of printing techniques that expand on the potential materials that can be printed.

ken gall

Translation of New Materials into Medical Implants featuring Ken Gall

Wednesday, November 20 from 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm | EMU Diamond Lake Room

Duke University mechanical engineering and materials science professor, Ken Gall, will be the inaugural speaker in this seminar series presented by the Knight Campus. Professor Gall will discuss the development and understanding of deployable shape memory polymers to mitigate damage when reattaching soft tissue to bone. He will also discuss a new approach to the formation of an interconnected surface porosity in a high strength polymer that results in the first-ever FDA clearance and clinical success of an all polymer spinal fusion cage with porosity. Finally, find out why 3D printed materials are shown to have promise as implantable materials for both custom and cleared patient-specific implants.

KNIGHT CAMPUS DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

brian druker

Imatinib as a Paradigm of Targeted Cancer Therapies

Brian Druker, MD, director of the Knight Cancer Institute and associate dean for oncology of the OHSU School of Medicine, will be the speaker at the next Knight Campus Distinguished Lecture. Dr. Druker will discuss how he spearheaded the highly successful clinical trials of imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, which led to FDA approval of the drug in record time.

When: Monday, October 7, 2019, 10:30 a.m.
Where: EMU Crater Lake Room

Reserve a Seat

more Upcoming Events

Aug 19
Knight Campus Seminar Series with Elizabeth Hillman10:00 a.m.

Join us for another seminar, part of the Knight Campus Seminar Series, with Elizabeth Hillman titled "New techniques for high-speed in-vivo imaging and microscopy"....
August 19 10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Diamond Lake Room

Join us for another seminar, part of the Knight Campus Seminar Series, with Elizabeth Hillman titled "New techniques for high-speed in-vivo imaging and microscopy". Elizabeth Hillman is a professor of biomedical engineering and radiology at Columbia University and a member of the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and Kavli Institute for Brain Science at Columbia. Hillman received her undergraduate degree in physics and PhD in medical physics and bioengineering at University College London and completed post-doctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Hillman has developed Swept Confocally Aligned Planar Excitation (SCAPE) to enable much higher speed 3D imaging of living samples. SCAPE uses scanned light sheet illumination in a novel single-objective configuration that requires no motion of the sample or objective providing speeds up to 300 volumes per second with minimal photobleaching. Another techniques Hillman has developed is wide-field optical mapping (WFOM) which enables real-time imaging of both neuronal and hemodynamic activity across the cortex of awake, behaving mice.

Sep 4
Ideas on Tap: Wildfires and Forest Management6:00 p.m.

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join UO research...
September 4 6:00 p.m.
Viking Braggot Co. Southtowne Plaza

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, join UO research professor and sustainable development expert Cassandra Moseley for an up-close look at Oregon forestry in an age of rapid climate change.  

Admission is free and space is limited. We recommend arriving early to secure a seat. Viking Braggot Company's Southtowne Pub is located at 2490 Willamette Street in Eugene.

Nov 6
Ideas on Tap: Town and Gown6:00 p.m.

Town and Gown: A Brief History of the LGBTQ Community on Campus and in Eugene   Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum...
November 6 6:00 p.m.
Viking Braggot Co. Southtowne Plaza

Town and Gown: A Brief History of the LGBTQ Community on Campus and in Eugene  

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. In November, we welcome Linda Long, Harriet Merrick, Lynn Pinckney, and Judith Raiskin of the Eugene Lesbian Oral History Project for a discussion of local LGBTQ history with a particular focus on Eugene's lesbian community. 

Admission is free and space is limited. We recommend arriving early to secure a seat. Viking Braggot Company's Southtowne Pub is located at 2490 Willamette Street in Eugene.

Dec 4
Ideas on Tap: Representation in Storytelling6:00 p.m.

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, University of Oregon...
December 4 6:00 p.m.
Viking Braggot Co. Southtowne Plaza

Quench your thirst—for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History's monthly pub talk. This month, University of Oregon journalism professor Torsten Kjellstrand delves into mainstream representations of Native people, discussing hazards that can arise when stories about Native communities are shaped by non-Native voices. 

Admission is free and space is limited. We recommend arriving early to secure a seat. Viking Braggot Company's Southtowne Pub is located at 2490 Willamette Street in Eugene.

Joint Science Seminars

recent events

The Future is Here
Bob Guldberg, Vice President and Executive Director of the Knight Campus, highlights his research on regenerative medicine and shares insights from his career translating new medical devices into improved patient care. 
A Spectrum of Promise

Laura Lee McIntyre gave a community presentation where she highlighted how early identification of developmental disorders can lead to promising intervention and prevention strategies.

Science at the Nexus of Life and Death

Patrick Phillips, professor of biology and special advisor to the president, gave a community lecture where he discussed his research on aging and the challenges and the opportunities created by the potential for prolonging life.

Mind, Brain and Reality
David McCormick, director of the Institute of Neuroscience, explored how the human brain creates the reality in which our minds operate at a community presentation.