Events

lens of the market

Lens of the Market Stage One: "Research2Innovation"

Monday, December 9 from 8:00 am - 5:00 pm | EMU Cedar Spruce Room

The Lens of the Market Program aims to provide participants with market awareness stemming from their own fundamental science pursuits to enhance the impact of their research and address global challenges. The program provides professional development in innovation to participants in the context of UO science research themes. There are research platforms from MSI, META/IMB, ION, Human Physiology, the Data Science Initiative, and the Knight Campus. Stage One provides a rapid introduction to the vocabulary, skills, tools, and road map needed to engage in successfully translating research into innovations.

 

For questions, please email Janet Macha.

kathleen hall jamieson

MCST Speaker Series featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson

Tuesday, March 10 (Time and Location TBA)

The Knight Campus is co-sponsoring the Media Center for Science and Technology's Speaker Series with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Jamieson’s work in science communication explores the gap between expert knowledge of scientific issues and the public perception of it. She is the editor of the Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication, a compendium of research by the leading scholars in this field. Jamieson is also the founder of FactCheck.org and its subsidiary SciCheck.

MCST

Winter Research Forum in Science Communication

Dates TBA

A wide range of faculty across the UO campus are engaged with research in the science of science communication. The MCST and the Knight Campus will convene an afternoon research forum in winter 2020 to bring together faculty and students interested in science communication. The event will focus on current and potential research at the UO in this area and in connecting collaborators across disciplines.

Joint Science Seminars calendar

more Upcoming Events

Dec 9
The Centralia Tragedy: 100 Years Later7:00 p.m.

On November 11, 1919, members of the radical Industrial Workers of the World violently clashed with veterans belonging to the American Legion in the small Washington logging town...
December 9 7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
Viking Braggot Southtowne Pub

On November 11, 1919, members of the radical Industrial Workers of the World violently clashed with veterans belonging to the American Legion in the small Washington logging town of Centralia. The conflict took place in a political climate not dissimilar from our own, 100 years later. This talk explores the connections between the Centralia Tragedy and our own time, and asks what the events of 1919 can tell us about politics in 2019.

Steven Beda, assistant professor of history, University of Oregon Department of History, is the speaker for this free History Pub.

Open to the public. Doors open at 6:00 p.m. Food and drinks will be available for purchase. This event is cosponsored by the Lane County History Museum and the UO Department of History.

Dec 11
Of mice and octopuses: Understanding how our brains work by studying animal vision6:00 p.m.

Neuroscientist Cris Niell studies how animals see, in order to better understand how our brains allow us to interact with the world. A biology professor in the University of...
December 11 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Downtown Athletic Club, Ax Billy Grill

Neuroscientist Cris Niell studies how animals see, in order to better understand how our brains allow us to interact with the world. A biology professor in the University of Oregon Institute of Neuroscience, Niell will discuss some of the takeaways from his research involving mice, octopuses and zebrafish in a free Quack Chats pub talk.

Jan 8
Quack Chats Pub Talk ‘Brain-Based Tips for Sticking to New Year’s Resolutions’6:00 p.m.

In the first Quack Chat of 2020, University of Oregon psychology professor Elliot Berkman will dive into the science of how habits work. Food and drinks available for purchase...
January 8 6:00 p.m.
Downtown Athletic Club, The Ax Billy

In the first Quack Chat of 2020, University of Oregon psychology professor Elliot Berkman will dive into the science of how habits work.

Food and drinks available for purchase at The Ax Billy.

Jan 23
Wine Chat: "Strange Cohabitations: Sharing Churches after the Reformation, 1530-2020"6:00 p.m.

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a...
January 23 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Civic Winery and Wines

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a 2019–20 OHC Faculty Research Fellow.

At one time or another, approximately 1,000 churches in Europe were shared by two or more Christian religions—Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinist. About 120 still exist today in France, Germany, and Switzerland; in recent years, a few new ones have been created. The story of how they formed, how they evolved, and how they faded away can tell us a great deal about the shifting meanings that ordinary people ascribed to community, religion, toleration, and intolerance from the sixteenth century to the present.

KNIGHT CAMPUS DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES

brian druker

Imatinib as a Paradigm of Targeted Cancer Therapies

Brian Druker, MD, director of the Knight Cancer Institute and associate dean for oncology of the OHSU School of Medicine, was the speaker at the second annual Knight Campus Distinguished Lecture. Dr. Druker discussed how he spearheaded the highly successful clinical trials of imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, which led to FDA approval of the drug in record time.

 

2019 Lecture

 

recent events

The Future is Here
Bob Guldberg, Vice President and Executive Director of the Knight Campus, highlights his research on regenerative medicine and shares insights from his career translating new medical devices into improved patient care.
A Spectrum of Promise

Laura Lee McIntyre gave a community presentation where she highlighted how early identification of developmental disorders can lead to promising intervention and prevention strategies.

Science at the Nexus of Life and Death

Patrick Phillips, professor of biology and special advisor to the president, gave a community lecture where he discussed his research on aging and the challenges and the opportunities created by the potential for prolonging life.

Mind, Brain and Reality
David McCormick, director of the Institute of Neuroscience, explored how the human brain creates the reality in which our minds operate at a community presentation.